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HOW TO BRING IN A VIRTUAL COACH

USE A VIRTUAL COACH

Do You Have a Virtual Coach?

What makes a great coach?  Everyone needs a coach.  Even the best players in sports use coaches. Coaches may not be physically better than the recipient of the coaching but they are observant and great at asking questions that make the recipient more aware.  They help the recipient learn and improve.

We may need someone to remind, to listen, to be a better alter ego, to catch us when we fall, to pick us back up and encourage.

We can’t always see our own faults.  Sometimes we need the coach to be a magnifying mirror.

Think about how you learned to ride a bike. Your coach, probably your Mom or Dad or a neighbor, held the back of the seat to steady the bike as you got a feel for balancing. They ran along, picked you and the bike up if you fell, maybe disinfected and bandaged the scrapes, and let go at the appropriate time.

During this difficult time I do all my coaching virtually, but I forecast that virtual will continue even when we can get back together so that distance doesn’t become a problem.  You will be able to choose a coach from anywhere in the world, you may even decide to choose me.

Emotional Intelligence

At one time it was thought your IQ was innate.

Do you remember taking an IQ test in school?  The results were shared with your parents but not you.  Having a high IQ apparently didn’t mean you were smart enough to handle the information. Some schools even divided students into the smart classes and the not smart classes.

Understanding Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence Pictured

The Faces of Emotional Intelligence
Research proved that what teachers were told about how smart (high IQ) a student was impacted how well that student did in class.  It affected the teacher’s expectations which then affected what they did and said to the student. In the end it affected how well that student did in school.

Now we understand that IQ is not completely fixed. We can grow in the areas tested as IQ.

And now we also understand that success in life is even more affected by your EQ, emotional intelligence.  How you understand and handle yourself, your own emotions.  And how you understand and interact with other personalities. This, too, is something you can learn and improve.

Let me know if you would like to know more about this subject.

You Can Think Like Leonardo DaVinci

What does it Mean to Think Like Leonardo de Vinci?

He combined art and science in everything he did. His sculpture and paintings incorporated science and his knowledge of the human body, muscles, and structure.
And his exploration of scientific topics was documented with beautiful, artistic drawings.
You can combine art and science in your own thinking. You can also combine your analytical left-brain thinking and creative right-brain thinking by taking notes using a mind map.

The Curve Ball in Business and Baseball

baseball curve ball

pitching a curve ball

Business expressions are often borrowed (or maybe stolen) from sports.

In baseball, the curve ball is one of the hardest pitches to hit and hit accurately. The pitch itself is thrown with a hard spin of the ball, causing the ball to drop or veer suddenly when it approaches home plate, while also maintaining a high speed (unlike the standard changeup). Its purpose is to “throw” the batter off or come as a surprise when not expected, causing them to swing and miss. Some of the best and hardest hitters in the game can train their whole life to be a great ball player, but the curve ball can slow them down very quickly when not prepared [just ask Pedro Serrano in the movie, “Major League”].

In business [and life], we use the expression to mean something unexpected, difficult to deal with, an obstacle, or a problem, especially a problem not foreseen. We can be really good at what we have in front of us, our daily routines, our normal tasks [the fastballs in life]. But those curve balls are what can really change our perspective and force us to take a step back, re-analyze, re-evaluate. That curve ball can be any size [or speed], from a slight change in a project, a cancellation of an event, or a big as a job loss, or a pandemic that changes the entire focus of a business.

We can also learn from the legal field and negotiation methods, just like those successful baseball players who practice hitting any and every form of a curve ball that is possible. A lawyer getting ready for a trial prepares for any and every question the opposition may ask. In negotiations, one brainstorms (see brainstorming techniques in several of my blogs on the subject) a list of every adverse possibility to be ready.

Now, in baseball and in business, a curve ball is expected and is more commonly thrown. It’s also evolved, with multiple versions, speeds, and occurrences. It’s extremely important to study each player, person, and scenario to know who can throw that curve ball, and when. Today, the best hitters in baseball, and the best business professionals, have made their way to the top by not only being able to predict when a curve ball will be thrown, but also being prepared and ready to “hit it out of the park” and continue to be successful.

Just as the term comes from baseball, we can learn from the sport on how to be more prepared for a situation coming ‘out of left field’; again, a baseball term. If we can be more prepared and ready for when a curve ball is thrown our way, we will be more successful as a person, a professional, and a business.

This blogpost was jointly written by
Baseball and sports marketing expert Riley Wancket
312-909-2430
riley.wancket@gmail.com

and

Author, Speaker, Business Brain Booster,
Hazel Wagner, PhD, MBA, BBB

The Swiss Army Knife for Critical Thinking

The late Tony Buzan called mind maps the Swiss Army knife for your brain

Mind maps turn ideas and thinking into a colorful diagram. It is a way to transfer your thoughts to paper (or your screen) and then imprint it more visually and permanently to your memory. 

You can use mind mapping for organizing, presenting, explaining, planning, learning, negotiating, taking notes, and making notes.

All you need is a piece of paper turned horizontally and some pens or pencils, preferably, but not required, in several colors. The different colors make the process more fun and the resulting drawing more memorable.

What to Do When Your Audience Thinks Different

Getting Your Idea Across to Business People who Think Different from You

It is tempting to present your ideas in the same manner that convinced you.

Your job was to collect and analyze the data not to present that data. Your job is to present the conclusion with 3 strong reasons why it is the best solution.

Then ask for questions and thoughts, followed by a quick repeat of the conclusion.

How to prove your point

Data may prove your point and drive away your audience at the same time

When we are trying to make a point, attract followers and support for an idea, we don’t want to appear to be expressing only our unsubstantiated opinions.

What to do? Use diagrams, not graphs and charts, use diagrams, simple drawings that make your point quickly and easily.

Grab a piece of paper or paper napkin if you are sitting in a restaurant, explain with a quick drawing. This is how it looks, this is how to get there, here is how I think it will fit, this is one way we can accomplish the goal, here is a mind map of the options we have.

Notre Dame

Not replaceable.  I am crying while watching Notre Dame in flames.  The art, the history, the beauty all destroyed by fire.  Some things can’t ever be reproduced.

Your Mental Shortcuts

Mental shortcuts, we all make them throughout the day. In a sense, they are necessary coping mechanisms your brain has been developing your whole life. Because there is no way to pay equal attention to everything within eyesight, earshot, and close enough to touch, our brain has developed filters to let in what it believes you need to know and leave out a large majority of what is going on around you.
Consider for a moment how you function during your daily drive or ride, or even walk, to work.
Most of what you pass by is a blur. Most of what you pass you take little or no interest. So much so that when you arrive at your destination you will not remember seeing or hearing most of what was actually there.
Your cognitive bias made those decisions for you. The filters you have built up to protect yourself from over stimulation and clutter worked.
But, and that is a big but, did you miss something that in the past wasn’t important but now is? Did you assume you knew what happened but really didn’t?
We can’t function in a busy world without our filters and we can’t take for granted that we didn’t miss anything important.
So what can you do? Ask others what they saw and heard. Ask for other viewpoints, other experiences, to add to your own. Be open minded about what you might have missed or added into a scene because of your filters, your own cognitive biases. They, too, have biases. Together you may both get a more complete picture.
Ask open questions and listen openly to the answers.

Start on Your Own When Brainstorming


Your best ideas will come to you unexpectedly.  Keep an old fashioned pen and paper handy or type into a notes section on your smart phone.

Just make lists at first.  Don’t discard anything because a seemingly ‘bad’ idea can be the trigger a whole raft of better ideas.

If your job is to get a whole team of people brainstorming, let everyone work on their own first.  One way is to challenge everyone with a required number of ideas that is bigger than anyone thinks they can do.  This forces writing down everything that comes to mind just to meet the requirement.

Then bring all the ideas together.  List them all. Organize them into natural categories to discover what categories have the most promise.  

Only then start to combine and build on the ideas offered.

For more on this topic see my TEDx talk:

Or get my book Power Brainstorming

#brainstorming, #powerbrainstorming, #hazelwagner